Individual critical reviews | Applied Sciences homework help

Category: Applied Sciences

Art  museums  and art  galleries  are two different types of entities.

The primary difference is that while one goes to an art museum to view art and learn about art from an educational or cultural experience; one goes to an art gallery to view art, discover new artists, possibly from the perspective of purchasing the art.  

Most museums are funded by governments, foundations, and corporate and private donors, and they are operated on a non-for-profit basis. Galleries seek to make profit and gain exposure for themselves and the artists they represent.Art galleries, are usually small businesses or centers that exhibit art for the purposes of promoting and selling art.  One would typically visit an art gallery to discover an artist, possibly with an interest in buying the art. Art museums, on the other hand, are larger and are intended for education and cultural experiences.  One would typically visit an art museum to view and study its permanent collection or to visit a touring exhibit of works on loan from another museum or institution.There are 2 parts to your Museum Critical Review assignment to be completed after visiting one or more of the following museum websites*:

*Not all of the museums will have the diversity of time periods that you will need to complete the assignment.  You may have to visit more than one of the listed museum websites if you choose one of the more time or region specific museums.    

ARTS 1301 NLC Art Appreciation Museum Critical Review Assignment and Worksheet

I hope you are inspired by your visit to the museum websites.  This assignment is designed to meet both Communication and Social Responsibility Student Learning Objectives.

There are 2 parts to your Museum Critical Review assignment to be completed after visiting one or more of the following museum websites*:

·  Dallas Museum of Art www.dma.org

·  Nasher Sculpture Center www.nashersculpturecenter.org

·  Meadows Museum of Art www.meadowsmuseumdallas.org/

·  Crow Collection www.crowcollection.org

·  Kimbell Art Museum www.kimbellart.org

·  Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth  www.themodern.org

·  Amon Carter Museum of American Art  www.cartermuseum.org

·  Google Arts and Culture Collections https://artsandculture.google.com/partner

*Not all of the museums will have the diversity of time periods that you will need to complete the assignment.  You may have to visit more than one of the listed museum websites if you choose to go to one of the more time or region specific museums.  Your instructor may choose to allow only a few of these museums to meet the assignment assessment.

Part 1.  CRITICAL REVIEW of Favorite Artwork– 50 Points

Don’t forget to find a favorite piece anywhere inside or outside of the museum.  Collect the information to complete the critical review later. 

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The purpose of this review is to critically interpret and evaluate a work of art. (ACGM guidelines, 2015).  

Based on student attendance a museum exhibition in their community

A critical analysis with personal reflection that demonstrates comprehension of event.

The date, place and time of the event will be cited as a source material

A minimum of 300 words, typed double-paced 12 point font

Measured with objective standards of Creative Thinking VALUE rubric

The assignment will be submitted via eCampus as instructed.

1.  ATTACH A PHOTO OF YOUR FAVORITE WORK OF ART ON THE MUSEUM WEBSITE.

2.  Description of art object (100 words) up to 30% of points earned for assignment________

Write the name of the art work being discussed, the artist’s name, the date created, name of museum, size, and a description of the piece or composition. In the description, create a visual image with words.  

3.  Analysis of the art object (100 words) up to 40% of points earned for assignment________

Based on the description provided in the introduction, analyze the artist’s intent or message within the work of art. Provide notated research (inquiry) to further interpret the background of the artist and the era in which it was created.  The innovation and expression of ideas of the artist should be better understood through this research.  Discuss the Visual Elements and Principles of Design.  Which Visual Elements and Principles of Design are present in this work of art and give examples. (The visual elements and principles of design are listed and defined at the bottom of the worksheet.)

4.  Interpretation of the art object (100 words)  up to 30% of points earned for assignment ________

Discuss the content of the piece.  Why was it created? Does it have a narrative or discuss social issues?  What emotional feeling is present?  Summarize your reaction to this art object.

Part 2:  TOUR OF MUSEUM— MUSEUM WORKSHEET, 50 points

NEW ACGM guidelines 2015:

1. Select 3 works of art from a museum(s) website(s).  Identify and describe these works of art based on their chronology (the time period they were created) and style, using the Visual Elements and Principles of Design as standard categories and terminology.

2. At least one of the objects you choose should allow you to investigate major artistic developments and significant works of art from the prehistoric period through the 14th century.

3. At least one work should reflect an understanding of intercultural values and ideas expressed by the creative artists. Write a critical analysis with personal reflection that will demonstrate comprehension of this event and its impact on the community.

4. Analyze the relationship of art to history by placing works of art within cultural, historical, and chronological contexts by comparing one piece you have selected from a particular period to another piece you have selected from the 15th century to the present.

Here’s a space for your notes to complete your MUSEUM WORKSHEET 50 POINTS ASSIGNMENT:

3 PIECES FROM THE TOUR ARE YOU SELECTING?

1. PIECE CREATED BETWEEN PREHISTORIC (3000 BCE) TIMES AND THE 14TH CENTURY (1400 CE)

ARTIST’S NAME IF LISTED

TITLE OF PIECE 

 DESCRIPTION/TITLE OF PIECE

 DATE OF PIECE  

MAJOR ARTISTIC DEVELOPMENTS NOTICED

2. PIECE THAT REFLECTS INTERCULTURAL VALUES AND IDEAS

 ARTIST’S NAME IF LISTED

 TITLE OF PIECE

 DESCRIPTION OF PIECE  

 DATE OF PIECE 

 CRITICAL ANALYSIS WITH PERSONAL REFLECTION THAT DEMONSTRATES COMPREHENSION OF THIS EVENT AND ITS IMPACT ON THE COMMUNITY.

3. PIECE CREATED BETWEEN THE 15TH CENTURY (1401 CE) AND TODAY (PRESENT)

 ARTIST’S NAME 

 TITLE OF PIECE

 DESCRIPTION OF PIECE

  DATE OF PIECE

  MAJOR ARTISTIC DEVELOPMENTS NOTICED

4. ANALYZE THE RELATIONSHIP OF ART TO HISTORY BY PLACING WORKS OF ART WITHIN CULTURAL, HISTORICAL, AND CHRONOLOGICAL CONTEXTS BY COMPARING ONE PIECE YOU HAVE SELECTED FROM A PARTICULAR PERIOD TO ANOTHER PIECE YOU HAVE SELECTED FROM THE 15TH CENTURY TO THE PRESENT.

Look for these VISUAL ELEMENTS: visual tools an artist has to make a work of art

1.  Line:  Lines can show outline, imply a third dimension, show direction or movement

2.  Shape and Mass:  Shape refers to 2 dimensions, for instance, a square.  Mass refers to 3 dimensions, for instance, a cube. 

3.  Light:  Light reveals form.  Where is the light source?  What is the range of values, from light to dark, in the art you are reviewing?  

4.  Color:  How does the artist use color in the art object you are reviewing?  Is it the primary colors only?  Is it emotionally soothing or jarring?  

5.  Texture and pattern:   Does the art object you are viewing have actual texture, could you feel it?  Or does it have implied texture, suggesting that it is smooth or rough?  Does it have an overall pattern on the surface?

6.  Space:  If your object is architectural or sculptural, it will have 3 dimensional space.  Try to describe the space.  If your object is two dimensional, how does the artist imply space, for example, through linear perspective, overlapping of objects, smaller or larger objects, or atmospheric perspective?

7.  Time and motion:  Does the art object imply time, for instance, a sunset, or motion, for instance, a sculpture that moves?

Look for these PRINCIPLES OF DESIGN:  the organization of the composition or design of the art work

1.  Unity and Variety:  Unity is a sense of oneness in the art.  Variety maintains interest in art

2.  Balance:  Symmetrical balance occurs when both sides of the art object are similar in size or shape.  Asymmetrical balance occurs when the two sides are quite different in the appearance of the objects in the art.

3.  Emphasis and Subordination:  How does the artist draw your eye to the center of attention of the art object?  How does the artist make the rest of the painting subordinate to the center of interest?

4.  Scale and Proportion:  Scale means size in relation to a standard or “normal” size.  Proportion refers to size relationships between parts of a whole, or between two or more items perceived as a unit.  Sometimes these are deliberately incorrect, as in Hierarchal Scale in the art of antiquity.

5.  Rhythm or repetition:  The repeated use of a color, shape or line to create expression

What is an art museum?

Art museums and art galleries are two different types of entities.

The primary difference is that while one goes to an art museum to view art and learn about art from an educational or cultural experience; one goes to an art gallery to view art, discover new artists, possibly from the perspective of purchasing the art.  

Most museums are funded by governments, foundations, and corporate and private donors, and they are operated on a non-for-profit basis. 

Galleries seek to make profit and gain exposure for themselves and the artists they represent.

Art galleries, are usually small businesses or centers that exhibit art for the purposes of promoting and selling art.  One would typically visit an art gallery to discover an artist, possibly with an interest in buying the art. 

Art museums, on the other hand, are larger and are intended for education and cultural experiences.  One would typically visit an art museum to view and study its permanent collection or to visit a touring exhibit of works on loan from another museum or institution.

Art History Century Timeline

BCE/BC Century Timelines

3500-2500  Prehistoric (Stone Age)

3300-0  Bronze & Iron Ages (Ancient Times)

CE/AD Century Timelines

1-100  First Century (Ancient Times)

101-200  Second Century (Ancient Times)

201-300  Third Century (Ancient Times)

301-400  Fourth Century (Ancient Times)

401-500  Fifth Century (Ancient Times)

501-600  Sixth Century (Middle Ages)

601-700  Seventh Century (Middle Ages)

701-800  Eighth Century (Middle Ages)

801-900  Ninth Century (Middle Ages)

901-1000  Tenth Century (Middle Ages)

1001-1100  Eleventh Century (Middle Ages)

1101-1200  Twelfth Century (Middle Ages)

1201-1300  Thirteenth Century (Middle Ages)

1301-1400  Fourteenth Century (Middle Ages)

1401-1500  Fifteenth Century (Early & High Renaissance)

1501-1600  Sixteenth Century (Northern Renaissance & Mannerism)

1601-1700  Seventeenth Century (Baroque)

1701-1800  Eighteenth Century (Baroque, Neoclassical, & Romanticism)

1801-1900  Nineteenth Century (Neoclassical, Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism, and Post Impressionism)

1901-2000  Twentieth Century (Post Impressionism, Fauvism, Expressionism, Cubism, Futurism, Supremativism, Constructivism, De Stijl, Dada, Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, & Pop Art

2001-2100  Twenty-first Century (Post Modernism)

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